Oord Nebo

I went to Oord Nebo on Tuesday and was on the water at around 9:00. The flow rate was about 30 kub m/s, the sky was clear and there was almost no wind. The first Smallie was netted at around 9:10 and the last one around 12:00. I got six in total with the last one weighing 3.5 kg. From 13:00 to 16:00 I did not even get a single touch. All in all a nice day.

– Herman Loubser

Herman and I went for a bit of fishing at Oord Nebo on Friday and we were on the water quite early since there were reports that there will be a thunderstorm later in the day. We wanted to get a good days fishing in before the storm hit.
The flow was good, the clarity of the water was a bit disappointing but this cleared up a little later the day.

At first I picked up the fish on a HUGE mustard caddis (no. 8 hook), and suddenly they went quiet. Best fish for the morning for me was just shy of 2,8 kg.

Herman got a few in morning mostly on a chartreuse caddis pattern. The chartreuse seemed to do the trick for the rest of day with most fish taken on it.
That being said there were no real pattern as to what the fish liked. Fish were taken on GRHE, green spider fly, PTN, bloodworm, mustard caddis and then the chatreuse caddis.

Between the two of us we probably landed close to twenty fish, so not a bad days of fishing.
Around 16h00 we decided to pack it up since there were thunder rolling in from the north west.

Geelvis op die Bokspruit rivier

Hier is my visse van die die week wat verby was in die Bokspruit rivier op die plaas. Ek was ‘n totaal van ses dae by die rivier waarvan ek agt geelvisse gevang het en te veel forelle.
Grootste forel van 35cm en geelvis van so 2.8kg. Die visvang was baie baie moeilik want die mense het ‘n water werk program geloots wat alle dooie bome laat afsaag het om water te spaar. So daar is geen wegkruip plek nie en ook gee koelte vir die warm son nie. Dit het die vlak van visvang nog moeiliker gemaak want daar is geen koelte waar jy kan weg kruip nie. Die water is baie skoon, jy kan dit drink en reg deur sien tot op die bodem van die rivier.
My eerste dag het ek baie gesukkel want ek kry nie reg om my vlieg by die vis te kry nie. Ek het eers ‘n “down stream nymphing” tegniek probeer maar die forelle is te vinnig om jou vlieg te vat voor die by die geelvis uit kom.
Ek beraam toe my plan om dit te oorweeg om reg teen aan die rivier te gaan sit waar ek onder ‘n dooie of afgesaakste stomp van ‘n wilger boom sit. Daar het ek dit reg gekry om teen aan die geelvis te kom wat onder verby my swem in die diep poel. Ek sien hulle gaan op na die oppervlakte om Mayfly’s te eet. Ek sit ‘n “Hydrolator Dry Fly” op en met die eerste gooi was dit vas.
Daarna was daar geen vis meer op droë vlieg nie maar net op swaar caddis nymphs wat jy op die bodem los en as hulle naby kom dit laat beweeg en jy hoop hulle tel dit op en spoeg dit nie uit nie!
Hier is my visse van die die week wat verby was in die Bokspruit rivier op die plaas. Ek was ‘n totaal van ses dae by die rivier waarvan ek agt geelvisse gevang het en te veel forelle.
Grootste forel van 35cm en geelvis van so 2.8kg. Die visvang was baie baie moeilik want die mense het ‘n water werk program geloots wat alle dooie bome laat afsaag het om water te spaar. So daar is geen wegkruip plek nie en ook gee koelte vir die warm son nie. Dit het die vlak van visvang nog moeiliker gemaak want daar is geen koelte waar jy kan weg kruip nie. Die water is baie skoon, jy kan dit drink en reg deur sien tot op die bodem van die rivier.
My eerste dag het ek baie gesukkel want ek kry nie reg om my vlieg by die vis te kry nie. Ek het eers ‘n “down stream nymphing” tegniek probeer maar die forelle is te vinnig om jou vlieg te vat voor die by die geelvis uit kom.
Ek beraam toe my plan om dit te oorweeg om reg teen aan die rivier te gaan sit waar ek onder ‘n dooie of afgesaakste stomp van ‘n wilger boom sit. Daar het ek dit reg gekry om teen aan die geelvis te kom wat onder verby my swem in die diep poel. Ek sien hulle gaan op na die oppervlakte om Mayfly’s te eet. Ek sit ‘n “Hydrolator Dry Fly” op en met die eerste gooi was dit vas.
Daarna was daar geen vis meer op droë vlieg nie maar net op swaar caddis nymphs wat jy op die bodem los en as hulle naby kom dit laat beweeg en jy hoop hulle tel dit op en spoeg dit nie uit nie!

– Erich Pienaar

24/11/2012- What a day!

What a day!!!!!!!

Someday it all just clicks on the water and Saterday  was one of those days. After a long hot week I was super amped for a lekker days fishing. The plan was to go fish a spot near Stilfontein, weather predictions for the day was mild rainy conditions and man did it rain at one stage I was soaked head to toe and to the bone.

But let’s get back to the fishing and I can summarise it in one word Awesome!

I have never experience such good fishing in a long time and it was one of my best days on the Vaal and I realised when things click on the Vaal it is one of the most productive pieces of water I have fished. We had a short upstream hike/ drift to the section of water we were going to fish and it looked good. From the get go the fish were taking the flies without thinking twice.

All the fish were in a good condition and fat and healthy.  The Smallies were taking the flies incredibly hard and I had a few fish jumping after setting the hook and there were one or two occasions where I popped my leader with fish to fast out of the blocks for me.

The flies that worked well on the day were PTN hot spots, little black mayflies PTN’s  with a hot orange bead , GHRE in Black, old faithful mister mustard caddis, black caddis control flies with hot orange bead and nymph skin caddis patterns with a gold bead on circle hooks.

We got off the water late with the hope that the fish would start rising after the monster mayfly hatch we experienced and wow what a hatch, clouds and clouds of mayflies but with the wind not playing the game it was hard spotting the fish but I think if the conditions stay the same we might have some incredible dry fly fishing in the coming weeks!  

I just want to say thank you to Gusti and Rob for making it an incredible day out and thank you for the good company and great chow like always.

Some photos to follow!

Taung Dam – 10 and 11 Nov 2012

“There will be days when the fishing is better than one’s most optimistic forecast, others when it is far worse.  Either is a gain over just staying home.”  – Roderick Haig-Brown, Fisherman’s Spring, 1951

The second part of this quote is most appropriate to describe the past weekend, we were 7 very keen fly-fisherman and we were expecting the Yellows to be everywhere in the shallows, ravenous and in a suicidal feeding frenzy. Eager to launch themselves at any Hopper, Beetle or other floating patterns we throw at them!

At least that was my forecast!

But just the opposite became apparent early on Saturday morning, Tinus and I managed to entice a few Yellows to surface flies and I was fortunate to get a decent Largemouth on a Water Dog “but the action was few and far between, everyone else also found the going extremely tough.

Saturday was a beautiful day compared to the past few weeks and we can only guess at the reason for the poor fishing ,it could be due to the very windy conditions over the past few weeks and low pressure system that prevailed. We had some fun when we all stopped for a siesta and a swim and thousands of small yellows turned up to feed on the dislodged algae and detritus. They were fun to catch on small Beetles and small midge patterns or anything we could throw at them and made us wish we had a Sage 00 weight rod .The large numbers of juvenile fish just proved that this dam still held enormous numbers of Yellowfish.

Nice Largemouth on a Waterdog (Horst Filters favourite patterns).
“Bragging may not bring happiness, but no man having caught a large fish goes home through an alley.” – Author Unknown

We were fortunate to spot a few Pink Flamingo’s on the water, probably on their way to a salt pan or the Kimberley area where there is a breeding colony.

The weekend still turned out great with the help of Agostino and his culinary skills and the good natured bantering of all the other guys and of course Shubert – the young St. Bernard who was quite entertaining in his youthful innocence.

In closing I leave you with the following quote

“The charm of fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope.” – John Buchan

– Marius Rousseau

How to Protect Yourself in a Thunderstorm

Some sound advice one of our member came across, would come in handy seeing that it is the rainy season and all.

  1. Understand what constitutes suitable shelter. The key to minimizing lightning danger is to get inside a protective structure. Substantial, frequently inhabited buildings (those grounded with plumbing, electrical systems, and, if possible, lightning rods) are best. Small structures, such as stand alone public restrooms, are generally not good choices, and standing under a tree is a very bad choice. If you can’t find a substantial structure, get in a car with a metal roof and sides: if the car is struck, the metal body will conduct the electricity around you, not through you. When you’re outside, determine where the nearest suitable structure is in advance so that you’ll be ready should you be caught in a lightning storm.
  2. Be aware. Unfortunately, if you’re summiting a mountain or out in your bass boat when a storm rolls in, finding shelter can be a real problem. The solution? Make your plans with dangerous weather in mind. Listen to the local weather forecast, and pay special attention to thunderstorm advisories. Research the local climate: in some areas you can almost guarantee a thunderstorm on summer afternoons. Schedule your activities to avoid many high-risk situations. Those hot muggy days are just the thing that a thunderstorm needs to get going.
  3. Watch the skies. When you’re out and about, watch the sky for signs of approaching thunderstorms, such as rain, darkening skies, or towering cumulonimbus clouds. If you can anticipate lightning before the first strike, you can avoid being caught in a bad situation. Note that lightning can, however, strike even in the absence of these indicators.
  4. Get to shelter as soon as you see lightning or hear thunder. Stay inside at least 30 minutes after the last strike. While most people seek shelter if lightning appears to be near, people commonly wait too long to seek shelter. If you can detect lightning, it may be close enough to strike you. Don’t wait for it to strike right next to you (or on top of you) to get to safety. If conditions permit good visibility, and it’s not practical to seek shelter whenever you notice a strike, use the 30 second rule: if the time between a lightning flash and the resulting thunder is 30 seconds or less (aka 6 miles or less), get to shelter immediately.
  5. Minimize your risk if you cannot reach shelter. Sometimes you can get caught in a storm despite the best precautions. If you are outside, move from higher to lower elevations. Avoid large open spaces where you are taller than anything else around you, like a golf course or soccer field, and stay away from isolated objects such as trees and light posts. If you’re fishing or swimming get out of and away from the water immediately. Get away from unprotected vehicles, such as golf carts, and unprotected structures, such as picnic shelters. Avoid long metal structures, i.e. bleachers.
  6. Take last-resort measures if you’re stuck in a dangerous place. If you’re in a group of people, spread out so there are several body lengths between each of you. Assume the lightning crouch:
    • Squat down with your feet together, your head tucked to your chest or between your knees, and your hands covering your ears or flat against your knees. This is a difficult position to hold and it by no means guarantees your safety. However, by making it easier for a lightning strike to flow over your body rather than through vital organs, you may be able to sustain a smaller injury from it.
  7. Know the signs of an imminent lightning strike. If lightning is about to strike you or strike near you, your hair may stand on end, or you may feel a tingling in your skin. Light metal objects may vibrate, and you may hear a crackling sound or “kee kee” sound. If you detect any of these signals, assume the lightning crouch immediately.
  8. Stay safe inside a structure. Once in a suitable shelter, you still need to take some extra precautions. Do not touch land-line phones, plugged-in electrical appliances, or door knobs; keep your distance from electrical or plumbing fixtures, electrical sockets, windows, and doors. Keep windows closed (this is especially important in a vehicle), and try to stay within inner rooms of the structure. Stay out of the bathtub or shower, and avoid indoor swimming pools. In a car, try to avoid touching any part of the metal frame or the car’s glass. In short, stay away from anything that may directly conduct electricity in the event of a strike.
  9. Treat a lightning victim. If someone is struck by lightning, call the emergency services immediately. Determine if his or her heart is beating and if he or she is breathing. Proceed with CPR or mouth-to-mouth resuscitation if warranted. If the person is still exposed to possible lightning strike (yes, lightning can and does strike the same place twice) see if you can safely move the person. People struck by lightning do not retain an electrical charge, so do not be afraid of treating a victim.
  10. If there is absolutely no shelter, squat on the ground, with as little parts as possible touching the ground, and your feet close together. Do not lie down as this will provide a bigger target for the lightning to strike.

    Source: How to Protect Yourself in a Thunderstorm

Stay safe while on the water!

On a side note, here is a picture send in by Piet van der Merwe, just outside his office building. Not so great news for the members gearing up for the Sterkfontein trip!